Drink and drugs

Alcohol and drugs can have a bad effect on your body.

Alcohol is a depressant drug. It makes you feel more relaxed and sociable at the beginning, but as you consume more it can lead to dizziness, slow reactions, being sick, feeling down and tearful and even aggression.

Drugs are chemicals that change the way your body works. There are many stereotypes and myths surrounding drug use but one thing is clear - there is no such thing as safe drug taking.

Nitrous Oxide (Laughing gas)

The long term damage of nitrous oxide is no laughing matterNitrous oxide is a colourless gas, most found in pressurised metal canisters, which can often be seen lying around the streets.

Nitrous Oxide, also known as laughing gas is often categorised as a ‘legal high’ and can be considered less risky than other drugs, such as synthetic cannabis and stimulant mixtures. However, if you take too much of it, you risk falling unconscious and/or suffocating from lack of oxygen.

What does laughing gas do to your body?

Inhaling ‘laughing gas’ might give you a short-term high but the long-term damage is no laughing matter.

When it is inhaled, it can make people feel happy, relaxed, dizzy and lead to hallucinations. Taking several doses can prolong the dream-like effects.

It is not a hallucinogen but there is often a distortion of audio and visual perceptions.

You may be more likely to try it after a few drinks and the dizzy feeling can increase the risk of you falling over and injuring yourself. This, along with suffocation from lack of oxygen, is a major risk of taking the drug.

The law

It is a criminal offence for anyone to supply you with nitrous oxide for recreational use. They could face a fine and a prison sentence of up to 7 years.

More information and advice

To find out more about drinking and drugs check these websites:

FRANK - straight forward information and advice about drugs

NHS Choices - the risks of drinking too much or abusing drugs

GOV.UK - drugs, alcohol and the law

Help

If you would like help, get in touch with us for confidential information, advice and support.

Please check the council's website to find out what help we can offer.

Other organisations that can help you:

Local support for drug and alcohol problems

If you have problems with alcohol:

If you are being affected by somebody else's drinking problem:

If you have questions about or problems with drugs:

 


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