Single year of age

Introduction 

The following article uses quick statistics for local authorities from the second release second phase, of the 2011 Census of Population downloaded from the Office for National Statistics website. The dataset was published in January 2013. This report presents selected information for the Lancashire-14 and Lancashire-12 areas, and individual local authority areas within these boundaries. 

Demographic details of a local population are very important and are used by public and private sector organisations to allocate resources and plan services.  The figures are also used as denominators in the calculation of rates, indicators and ratios, such as unemployment rates.

The main population base for outputs from the 2011 Census is the usual resident population as at census day 27 March 2011.  A usual resident of the UK is anyone who, on census day, was in the UK and had stayed or intended to stay in the UK for a period of 12 months or more, or had a permanent UK address and was outside the UK and intended to be outside the UK for less than 12 months. Although the population base for enumeration included non-UK short-term residents, this population is analysed separately and is not included in the main outputs from the 2011 Census. All outputs, unless specified, are produced using only usual residents of the UK.

The Lancashire perspective

The usual resident population of the Lancashire-14 area was 1,460,893 at the time of the 2011 Census. The largest single year age group was aged 46 years (22,099 people). They are part of the 1960s baby boom generation who were aged between 39 and 50 years at the 2011 Census. In each of these single year age groups there were more than 20,000 people. Other large single year age groups were those aged 63 and 64 years and to a lesser extent 62 year olds. They are the post war baby boom babies born between 1946 and 1948.

There was also a high in the number of 18 and 19 year olds (over 21,000 people in each single year age group). This was likely in part due to a baby boom in the late 1980s. However the general picture at this age is complicated as young adults go to university. As a result the number of people in the 18 to 21 year old year groups falls in areas where they have grown up and rises in areas with universities.          

Numbers were lowest in single year age groups for those aged 7 to 9 year olds and 32 to 35 year olds. People in their mid-thirties were born during the difficult economic times of the mid 1970s.   

The number of children in single year age groups up to five years old were relatively flat at around 17,500 in each.    

The usual resident population of the Lancashire-12 area was 1,171,339. The largest single year age group was aged 46 years (17,828 people). They are part of the 1960s baby boom generation who were aged between 39 and 50 years at the 2011 Census. In each of these single year age groups there were between 16 and 17 thousand people. Other large single year age groups were those aged 63 and 64 years old and to a lesser extent 62 year olds. They are the post war baby boom babies born between 1946 and 1948. 

There was also a high in the number of 18 and 19 year olds (over 17,000 people in each single year age group). This was likely in part due to a baby boom in the late 1980s. However the general picture at this age is complicated as young adults go to university. As a result the number of people in the 18 to 21 year old year groups falls in areas where they have grown up and rises in areas with universities.          

Numbers were lowest in single year age groups for those aged 7 to 9 year olds and 32 to 35 year olds. People in their mid-thirties were born during the difficult economic times of the mid 1970s.   

The number of children in single year age groups up to five years old is relatively flat at between 13,500 and 13,800 in each. 

Please click here to view single year of age results for each Lancashire local authority, and for the Lancashire-12 and 14 areas (48 KB, Excel) 

Table 1. Largest single year age groups

  Largest single year age-group Number of people in your group
Burnley 42 year olds 1,312
Chorley 46 and 47 year olds 1,754 in each year
Fylde 64 year olds 1,277
Hyndburn 42 year olds 1,265
Lancaster 20 year olds 4,102
Pendle  under 1 year olds 1,328
Preston 20 year olds 3,489
Ribble Valley 46 year olds 1,021
Rossendale 42 year olds 1,128
South Ribble 46 year olds 1,792
West Lancashire 19 year olds 1,924
Wyre 64 year olds 1,866
Lancashire-12 46 year olds 17,828
Blackburn with Darwen 3 year olds 2,340
Blackpool 46 year olds 2,276
Lancashire-14 46 year olds 22,099

Source: 2011 census

Changes at particular ages were noticeable in several areas. For example, a drop between the number of 17 year olds and 18 year olds was noticeable in Blackburn with Darwen, Chorley, Fylde, Ribble Valley, Rossendale, South Ribble and Wyre. Generally, this lower number of people remained until around age 21 and was presumably, young people going to university. The drop was minimal, and tended to be between age 18 and 19 years, in Burnley, Pendle and Hyndburn. Similarly, there was no drop at age 18 in Blackpool although there was a small one at between 19 and 20 years.

In contrast there were large increases in the number of people aged 18 to the early twenties in Lancaster and Preston and to a lesser extent in West Lancashire. This was of course due to the universities in these locations.     

Page updated July 2012