Unintentional and deliberate injuries

Unintentional and deliberate injuries are a major cause of premature mortality in children and young people. They can also be a source of long-term physical and mental health issues and have been identified as a major health inequality with studies finding an association between unintentional injuries and deprivation. With analysis conducted by Public Health England finding that children, aged under 5, from more deprived communities experience higher rates of emergency hospital admissions, related to unintentional injuries than children from the least deprived communities.

Public Health England have developed three indictors related to hospital admissions caused by unintentional and deliberate injuries in children and young people.

  • Hospital admissions caused by unintentional and deliberate injuries in children (aged 0-4 years)
  • Hospital admissions caused by unintentional and deliberate injuries in children (aged 0-14 years)
  • Hospital admissions caused by unintentional and deliberate injuries in children (aged 15-24 years)

The latest figures (2015/16), show that Lancashire-12 recorded a significantly higher crude admission rate per 10,000 for all three indicators when compared to England, with trend line analysis highlighting that this has been the case for the past six years. Although on a positive note the rate for young people (aged 15-24) is coming down.

Additional analysis of the 2015/16 Lancashire-12 figures found the following :

  • The districts of Fylde, Ribble Valley and West Lancashire were the only districts to record 0-4 rates that were not significantly above the national average.
  • Fylde was the only district not to record a 0-14 rate significantly above the national average
  • For young people (aged 15-24) only Burnley, Hyndburn and Wyre recorded rates that were significantly above the England rate, with Preston and South Ribble recording rates that were significantly below it.

Blackpool also recorded a significantly high admission rate against all three of these indicators, whilst Blackburn was found to have a significantly high rate of admissions for children aged 0-4 and aged 0-14 with the areas young persons (aged 15-24) admissions rate found to be in line with the national figure.

For information around self-harm please see our suicide page, whilst information around traffic accidents can be found on our road traffic collisions page. 

Further data and analysis

Children and young people self-harm 2014 (PDF 223 KB)

Hospital admissions by unintentional and deliberate injuries in children 2015-16 (XLSX 112 KB)

Page updated October 2017

Trauma and injury

  • Falls
  • Unintentional and deliberate injuries