Suicide

Summary

Suicide remains a major public health issue and is a devastating event for families and communities. According to the Mental Health Foundation, around 75% of suicides are men and in almost all cultures, the suicide rate rises with age. Male suicide rates are on average 3-5 times higher than female rates. In England, the age group with the highest suicide rate is 45-49 years for males and 50-54 years for females (Samaritans' Suicide Statistics report, 2016).

Suicide is a significant cause of death in young adults, and is seen as an indicator of underlying rates of mental ill-health.

People with a diagnosed mental health condition are at particular risk: around 90% of suicide victims suffer from a psychiatric disorder at the time of their death. Those at the highest risk of suicide are people who are affected by alcoholism, clinical depression or schizophrenia. Previous suicide attempts are also an indication of particular risk. Up to 20% of survivors try again within a year, and as a group they are 100 times more likely to go on to die from suicide than those who have never attempted suicide.

Key figures for the Lancashire-14 area

Deaths from suicide and injury of undetermined intent

Unless specified the rates below are per 100,000 of the population and the most recent published data for the Lancashire-14 area show that:

  • Between the period 2013 to 2015, 461 persons died with the original underlying cause of death being suicide and injury of undetermined intent; 341 males and 120 females.
  • In the Lancashire-12 area overall (11.6), Preston (16.8) and Blackpool (16.6) the rate of deaths from suicide and injury of undetermined intent is significantly worse than the England rate (10.1).
  • Residents of Preston, Blackpool, Blackburn with Darwen and Lancaster combined, account for 45% of the Lancashire-14 area's deaths from suicide and injury of undetermined intent.
  • Males account for approximately three-quarters of deaths from suicide and injury of undetermined intent.
  • In Preston and Blackpool the rate of male deaths from suicide and injury of undetermined intent is significantly worse than the England rate.

Emergency hospital admissions for intentional self-harm

Self-harm is an expression of personal distress and it can be the result of a wide range of psychiatric, psychological, social or physical problems. Self-harm can be a risk factor for subsequent suicide, but not everyone who self-harms is suicidal. The rates below are per 100,000 of the population. 

  • In Blackpool (635.3), Hyndburn (295.0), Burnley (294.6), Blackburn with Darwen (283.5), Wyre (277.5), Lancaster (274.0), Fylde (257.0), Chorley (233.6) and the Lancashire-12 area overall (235.0) the 2015/16 rate of emergency hospital admissions for intentional self-harm is significantly higher than the England rate (196.5).

For further data, please see deaths from suicide and injury undetermined_L14_data (XLSX 333 KB) and emergency hospital admissions for self-harm_L14_data (XLSX 46 KB).

Further data and analysis

Deaths from suicide and injuries of undetermined (PDF 1,329 KB)

Deaths from suicide and injury undetermined L-14 data (XLSX 333 KB)

Emergency hospital admissions for self-harm L-14 data (XLSX 46 KB)

Page updated May 2017