Limiting long-term illness

The analysis on this page is based on data from the 2011 Census.

On the day of the census, March 27th 2011, a total of 8.5% of people in England and Wales had some major form of limiting long-term illness. For the Lancashire-12 area, the percentage was higher at 9.8% whilst for the Lancashire-14 area, the figure was 10.3% Ribble Valley (7.1%) was the only Lancashire authority to record a rate that was below the national average. Nine Lancashire authorities recorded rates in excess of 10% including Blackpool where the percentage was a substantial 13.5%.

For England and Wales, 82.1% did not have their day-today activities limited by health. The Lancashire-12 and Lancashire-14 area percentages were 79.9% and 79.4% respectively. Once again, Ribble Valley (83.3%) was the only authority to record a percentage in excess of the national average. In comparison, Wyre and Blackpool recorded the lowest percentages in Lancashire of 76.2% and 74.4%.

In total, 45.9% of residents in Lancashire-12 described themselves as being in very good health, whilst 6.3% describe themselves in bad or very bad health. For Lancashire-14, the percentages were 45.3% and 6.7%. For England and Wales, 47.1% were said to be in very good health and 5.6% in bad or very bad health.

Ribble Valley was the only Lancashire authority where over 50% of people considered their health to be very good. Chorley and South Ribble were the only other two areas to record rates in excess of the national average. Blackpool was the only Lancashire authority where under 40% said they were in very good health, and 9.5% of people were in bad or very bad health.

Our full analysis of health from the 2011 Census can be downloaded below. We have also produced some detailed interactive maps. Figures are available for Lancashire local authorities and for lower super output areas. 

Page updated January 2013