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Bowland Festival 2006
Walk along the Roman Road across the Bowland Fells

The Roman road over the Bowland Fells via Croasdale is one of the most spectacular in the country but it is very awkward to do as transport between the two ends is non-existant. However, as part of the Bowland Festival 2006 an organised walk was arranged with transpost laid on to each end. It was led by Peter Iles, the county's archaeologist, Bowland Ranger Tarja Wilson and David Ratledge. The route was from south to north - by far the easiest way to go.

The following are the photos from that walk along the Roman road - click on the photos for an enlarged view.

Picture 1:
Looking back (south) along the line of the Road from Low Fell, at the entrance to Croasdale, towards Browsholme Height and Longridge Fell beyond. The Roman Road is angling in to join the modern track here. One of its ditches is evident across the field.
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2:

Heading into Croasdale. The modern track now overlies the Roman Road for the next 3 miles

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3:

New Bridge looking north towards the old quarry. The name New Bridge gives a clue that it isn't Roman! However, there are several stone culverts on the road which could be Roman.

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4:

Looking back (south) from near the Quarry

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5:

Near the Quarry looking north. The modern track still following the Roman Road

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6:

Looking back (south) approaching the gate at the head of Croasdale. Near here are several roadside pits which are perhaps where the Romans excavated material for making the road.

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7:

At the gate at the head of Croasdale looking north. This stretch of the road has had to be repaired following damage by 4x4 vehicles. These are now banned.

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8:

Looking north towards the Whitendale footpath sign.

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9:

Looking north from near Shooters Clough. The Roman Road is probably slightly offset to the left (south) here and the modern track comes back on line again just before it leaves left for Hornby.

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10:

The turn off point. The Hornby Road and the Roman Road diverge - actually it's the Hornby Road that turns off and Roman Road carries straight on. The traces of the Roman Road are there but needlooking for!

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11:

Stood on the Roman Road looking back to the turn off point - the road is evident but tricky to spot.

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12:

Looking north on the curving part of the Roman Road. The photograph has been taken standing on the road which has been terraced into the slope of Round Hill. The person in the picture is stood on the cutting of the Roman Road above the road terrace.

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13:

Looking downhill (north) from Round Hill. The Roman road is now dead straight and can be identified by the change of colour of the vegatation downhill and beyond Dale Deck

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14:

The agger (mound) of the Roman Road is pronounced on this downhill section.

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15:

Looking back (south) up Round Hill - again the agger and the width of the road is clear. The left (east) ditch is very prominent.

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16:

After crossing Dale Beck looking south. Did it cross the beck in a straight line or zig-zag upstream? There is some evidence of an angled terrace down but the vegetation marks seem to imply dead straight.

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17:

Beyond Dale Beck standing on the Roman agger looking back to Round Hill.

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18:

Looking back (south) on the line from where the track to Botton Head from Botton Bridge crosses the line.

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19:

The map shows the line going straight across the ravine of Whit(e)ray Beck (an 80 foot drop!). The local farmer showed us the correct line where it angles upstream down a faint terrace to ford the beck. Peter Iles is stood on the line

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