Welcome to your Lancashire

Average gross household income by wards

Lancashire Profile > Earnings, Benefits and other Income > Income/ Earnings > Average gross household income by wards

JSNA/Research and Intelligence A-Z search: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Last updated August 2013 by Bryan Moulding with data from 2013

Average gross household income 2013 

Summary

Analysis of the gross mean household income results for 2013 reveals that for the Lancashire County Council area, the figure was £34,200.  The broader Lancashire 14-uthority area, which includes the two unitary authorities, recorded a lower average of £33,800.  In comparison, the North West average for 2013 was £33,800 whilst the GB figure was £36,000.  

Ribble Valley and Chorley had the highest mean and median income results in the county, whilst in both cases Blackpool recorded the lowest. The median figures are noticeably lower for each area since they are the middle or typical income value, and are less influenced by very high or low results that can distort the mean figures. 

The distribution at the ward level confirms that the wealthiest wards in Lancashire are in rural/suburban areas close to the major population centres in the county. They are also locations from which people can easily commute to Manchester or Liverpool.  Pennine ward in Chorley district, with a mean income between £54-55,000, comfortably retains its position of having the largest average income in Lancashire. In contrast, the result for Audley in central Blackburn was between £21,000 and £22,000, which was some way behind the next lowest ward in Lancashire.

Introduction

This research monitor details estimates of gross household income before tax (including earnings, investment income and welfare payments) down to the ward level. The information is derived from the ‘paycheck’ system, which is managed by the private sector consultancy group CACI. Please note that confidentiality restrictions prohibit the full disclosure of the exact figures.

Paycheck uses information on millions of households from CACI’s lifestyle database, along with census and market research data to increase reliability.  This allows robust household income figures to be produced for Lancashire districts and wards.

Lancashire County Council has acquired the 2013 gross household income details for all the wards and local authorities in the 14-authority Lancashire area. The information has been selectively used in this report to highlight areas of wealth and income deprivation within the county.    

The Lancashire results (mean household income)

For the Lancashire County Council area, which excludes Blackburn with Darwen and Blackpool unitary authorities, average (mean) household income for 2013, was £34,200. The broader Lancashire-14 area, which includes the two unitary authorities, recorded a noticeably lower average of £33,800. In comparison, the North West average for 2013 was £33,800 whilst the GB figure was £36,000. The results reveal a respectable mean household income figure for the Lancashire County Council area that is the same as the regional average, but it is somewhat behind the GB figure.   

2013 district mean income graph

 

 

Figure 1 ranks the CACI results for each local authority in the county. Ribble Valley is the most prosperous authority with Chorley in second place. South Ribble and Fylde were the two other Lancashire authorities that recorded gross mean household income results that were above the national average.  

At the lower end of the spectrum, Blackpool recorded the lowest mean gross income figure, being the only authority with an average below £30,000 per year. The four East Lancashire authorities of Burnley, Pendle, Hyndburn and Blackburn with Darwen together recorded averages of between £31-32,000.

Between 2012 and 2013, mean income at the national level showed no change, whilst in Lancashire, all authorities recorded yearly declines apart from Lancaster where there was a small increase of 0.2%. The 0.5% yearly increase for the Lancashire-14 area is inconsistent with the other yearly change results in Lancashire and probably reflects a statistical anomaly with the data.

The results reveal a small widening in disparities over the past year within Lancashire. Ribble Valley and Chorley recorded only minor decreases of 0.3%, whilst Burnley and Pendle saw declines of 2.0%.

Table 1 Average (mean and median) gross household income - 2013

 
Average (Mean) Gross Income *
Percentage Change (Mean Gross Income), 2012-13
Average (Median) Gross Income *
Burnley
£31-32,000
-2.0%
£24-25,000
Chorley
£38-39,000
-0.3%
£29-30,000
Fylde
£36-37,000
-0.5%
£28-29,000
Hyndburn
£31-32,000
-0.4%
£24-25,000
Lancaster
£32-33,000
0.2%
£25-26,000
Pendle
£31-32,000
-2.0%
£24-25,000
Preston
£32-33,000
-0.2%
£24-25,000
Ribble Valley
£39-40,000
-0.3%
£31-32,000
Rossendale
£34-35,000
-1.3%
£27-28,000
South Ribble
£36-37,000
-0.2%
£29-30,000
West Lancashire
£35-36,000
-0.6%
£27-28,000
Wyre
£33-34,000
-0.6%
£25-26,000
Lancashire (12 districts)
£34,200
-0.6%
£26,500
Blackburn with Darwen UA
£31-32,000
-0.6%
£23-24,000
Blackpool UA
£29-30,000
-1.0%
£22-23,000
Lancashire (14 authorities)
£33,800
**0.5%
£26,300
North West
£33,800
-0.6%
£26,000
Great Britain
£36,000
0.0%
£28,000

Source: CACI.

* Confidentiality restrictions preclude the publication of the exact figures at the local authority level.

** The 0.5% yearly increase for the Lancashire-14 area is inconsistent with the other yearly change results in Lancashire and probably reflects a statistical anomaly with the data.

Household income information measures wealth by area of residence therefore the more urbanised districts are likely to see some of the wealth generated in their area lost to the more rural districts that are popular with commuters. The inward migration of wealthy retired/semi-retired individuals will also augment a district’s average gross income figure.

The rural Ribble Valley district is a popular location to live and commute elsewhere to work. West Lancashire is a good base for commuting to Merseyside, whilst Rossendale benefits from its location to the north of Manchester. Chorley and South Ribble are suitable locations for commuters to either Manchester or Preston. In contrast, commuting patterns work against areas such as Blackpool, Blackburn, Burnley and Preston, which on balance tend to have more inward than outward commuters.   

Median gross household income 

Table 1 also includes results for median income levels.  The median income value represents the mid-point along the range of incomes in a particular area. Fifty percent of households will be distributed below the median income value and 50% above the median level. Median results are more reflective of the ‘typical’ income, and have the advantage over mean income data as they are less influenced by extreme values within the distribution of income data. 

Table 1 clearly demonstrates the much lower median values and confirms the fact that the typical income for most households is much lower than the mean figures may suggest.  In general, the median figures are around 23% below the mean results for each area.

Mean gross household income at the ward level

The 2013 ward results indicate that Pennine ward in Chorley district, with a mean income between £54-55,000, comfortably retains its position of recording the highest average income in Lancashire (Table 2).  In second place was North Turton with Tockholes, a predominantly rural area to the south of Blackburn. Fernhurst ward which benefits from its proximity to junction 4 of the M65 was in third place, whilst Clayton-le-Woods and Whittle-le-Woods in Chorley district was fourth.

Ward income bands map 2013

 

The most affluent wards in the county are in rural/suburban areas that are close to the major urban centres. These represent popular areas for commuting to the core urban areas in Lancashire, and to Manchester or Liverpool. To the north of the county around Lancaster, the rural wards are somewhat more isolated and do not benefit to such a large extent from affluent commuters.  In contrast, Ribble Valley has eight of the wards in Lancashire with the highest average incomes.

 

Table 2. The 20 wards with the highest average (mean) gross household income in the broader Lancashire, 2013

 

Lancashire Ranking
Ward
District
Average (mean) Income *
Percentage Change 2012-2013
 1
Pennine
Chorley
£54-55,000
-3.0
 2
North Turton with Tockholes
Blackburn with Darwen
£50-51,000
-0.3
 3
Fernhurst
Blackburn with Darwen
£49-50,000
-3.5
 4
Clayton-le-Woods and Whittle-le-Woods
Chorley
£48-49,000
2.8
 5
Wilpshire  
Ribble Valley
£47-48,000
-1.7
 6
Billington and Old Langho
Ribble Valley
£47-48,000
-5.2
 7
Langho
Ribble Valley
£45-46,000
2.2
 8
Parbold
West Lancashire
£45-46,000
0.8
 9
Garrison
Preston
£45-46,000
0.0
10
Beardwood with Lammack
Blackburn With Darwen
£45-46,000
1.4
11
Aighton, Bailey and Chaigley
Ribble Valley
£44-45,000
3.7
12
Clayton-le-Dale with Ramsgreave
Ribble Valley
£44-45,000
2.8
13
Brindle and Hoghton
Chorley
£44-45,000
0.3
14
Read and Simonstone
Ribble Valley
£44-45,000
0.2
15
Lea
Preston
£44-45,000
-0.8
16
Ribby-with-Wrea
Fylde
£44-45,000
-0.4
17
Calder
Ribble Valley
£44-45,000
-1.2
18
Wiswell and Pendleton
Ribble Valley
£43-44,000
1.7
19
Wheelton and Withnell
Chorley
£43-44,000
0.4
20
Higham and Pendleside
Pendle
£43-44,000
-3.6
  

Source: www.caci.co.uk

* Confidentiality restrictions preclude publication of the exact numbers at the ward level. 

Table 3 reveals that of the 20 wards with the lowest average figures, four each were in Preston and Blackburn with Darwen, three were in Hyndburn along with three more in Blackpool. Burnley, Pendle and Wyre each had two wards in the table.

Blackburn with Darwen authority has three in the top twenty, but also four in the bottom 20. This dramatically emphasises the large disparities that can be found within this authority.  Pendle and Preston are the other two Lancashire authorities with some of the most and least affluent wards in the Lancashire. A number of the affluent wards in these three authorities border the Ribble Valley, and highlight the fact that the general affluence of the Ribble Valley area extends beyond the actual boundary of the local authority. 

Table 3. The 20 wards with the lowest average (mean) gross household income in the broader Lancashire sub-region, 2013

Lancashire Ranking
Ward
District
Average (mean) Income*
 
Percentage Change 2012-2013
283
Town Centre
Preston
£26-27,000
1.8
284
Spring Hill
Hyndburn
£25-26,000
-0.1
285
Pharos
Wyre
£25-26,000
-1.7
286
Claremont
Blackpool
£25-26,000
-1.4
287
Clifton
Blackpool
£25-26,000
-1.7
288
Mount
Wyre
£25-26,000
0.0
289
Bank Hall
Burnley
£25-26,000
-2.9
290
Ribbleton
Preston
£25-26,000
-1.2
291
Sudell
Blackburn with Darwen
£24-25,000
-2.1
292
Shadsworth with Whitebirk
Blackburn with Darwen
£24-25,000
-2.7
293
St Matthew's
Preston
£24-25,000
0.0
294
Daneshouse with Stoneyholme
Burnley
£24-25,000
-0.5
295
Church
Hyndburn
£24-25,000
-2.4
296
Wensley Fold
Blackburn with Darwen
£24-25,000
1.9
297
St George's
Preston
£23-24,000
-1.0
298
Whitefield
Pendle
£23-24,000
-4.4
299
Bloomfield
Blackpool
£23-24,000
-3.5
300
Central
Hyndburn
£23-24,000
2.3
301
Bradley
Pendle
£23-24,000
-0.9
302
Audley
Blackburn with Darwen
£21-22,000
-1.4

 

Source: www.caci.co.uk

* Confidentiality restricts preclude publication of the exact numbers at the ward level.

© 2014, Lancashire County CouncilPhone: 0300 123 6701 email: enquiries@lancashire.gov.uk